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The importance of the nucleon-nucleon correlations for the eta-alpha S-wave scattering length, and the pi0-eta mixing angle in the low-energy eta-alpha scattering length model

Ceci, Saša; Hrupec, Dario; Švarc, Alfred (1999) The importance of the nucleon-nucleon correlations for the eta-alpha S-wave scattering length, and the pi0-eta mixing angle in the low-energy eta-alpha scattering length model. Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics, 25 (6). L35-L41. ISSN 0954-3899

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Abstract

Using the new set of dd-->eta alpha near-threshold experimental data, the estimate of the importance of the nucleon-nucleon correlations for the eta-alpha S-wave scattering length in the multiple scattering theory is obtained using the low-energy scattering length model. The contribution turns out to be much bigger then previously believed. Th epi0-eta mixing angle is extracted using the experimental data on the dd-->eta alpha and dd-->pi0 alpha processes. The model is dominated by the subthreshold extrapolation recipe for the eta-alpha scattering amplitudes. When the recipe is chosen, the model is completely insensitive to the eta-alpha parameters for the subthreshold value of the eta cm momentum p(eta)2= -(0.46)fm-2. Provided that the subthreshold extrapolation is correct, a good estimate of the pi0-eta mixing angle is obtained if the experimental cross sections for the dd-->pi0 alpha reaction at the corresponding deuteron input energy is taken from the literature.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: eta-alpha scattering length, pi0-eta mixing angle
Subjects: NATURAL SCIENCES
NATURAL SCIENCES > Physics > Nuclear Physics
Divisions: Division of Experimental Physics
Depositing User: Dario Hrupec
Date Deposited: 21 Mar 2014 18:06
Last Modified: 21 Mar 2014 18:06
URI: http://fulir.irb.hr/id/eprint/1319
DOI: 10.1088/0954-3899/25/6/101

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